What differences are observed by region in the Talent Value Proposition?
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“The employee value proposition is constantly being revised because the market is very dynamic and our business model is evolving and diversifying, so it is necessary to attract new profiles and give different responsibilities to the people who bet on their project”.


Javier Castro – CEO BeeDigital


In all countries there is a predominant concern with the Work Environment and Culture, which are the most valued aspects of the company’s value proposition. However, there are different priorities in terms of the aspects to be improved in the short term:


Aspects of Working Short Term
By Order of Priority
Argentina, Brazil, Colombia And Venezuela
Chile, Iberia, Mexico And Peru

Compensation

Development/training/career plans

Development/training/career plans

Compensation

Flexibility/conciliation policies

Argentina, Brazil, Colombia And Venezuela

Compensation

Development/training/career plans

Chile, Iberia, Mexico And Peru

Development/training/career plans

Compensation

Flexibility/conciliation policies

Although the priorities appear quite similar, it is clear that there is a high degree of overlap between countries that are still in the early stages of more sophisticated talent management, and those that have advanced further in this area, making more progress in the “soft” aspects of talent management. As in “Maslow’s Pyramid,” some countries focus their short-term priorities on the most basic or hygienic needs, while others focus on long-term aspects that have a greater impact on long-term motivation.

What differences are observed by the industry in the Talent Value Proposition?


As employees we want everything the company can give us: work-life balance, high pay, training, development… etc. However, what really motivates our people is the impact our business has on society. The project comes first.


Cayetana Pablos – Chief Transformation Officer - ING


Finding hybrid work models that are satisfactory for the company and the employee is a priority objective in most sectors, while there is a high level of interest in factors related to future career: development plans, training, and career models. Our people need a sense of purpose, a connection between their work and the company’s mission, but they also need a sense of professional purpose; they seek to progress; either through technical and specialized training, or through “zig-zag” career paths that allow them to accumulate experience and knowledge. To build loyalty and keep their talent engaged, companies have a clear mission: to unlock the potential of their professionals by giving them opportunities and offering them the support they need to grow.

Aspects that must improve in PVT
By Order of Importance

LIFE SCIENCES

Flexibility/Reconciliation policies

Work environment/Culture

Development plans/training/career

Compensation

RETAIL & CONSUMER GOODS

Flexibility/ Reconciliation policies

Work environment/ Culture

Development/training/career plans

Compensation

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Development/training/career plans

Compensation

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Development/training/career plans

Compensation

MANUFACTURING

Development/training/career plans

 

Compensation, which has traditionally been the cornerstone of “attraction and retention” policies, is still present, but it is no longer the essential element of “attraction and retention” proposals. Companies - and their leaders - are becoming more human; they share their purpose with their people, and they have also become aware of the expectations and personal purpose of their people. In a world where talent shortages have diminished the traditional “asymmetry” between employer and employee, relationships are increasingly established as “equals” based on mutual respect for common interests and aspirations.